Ans: UNICEF’s The State of the World’s Children Report – Reimagine the future: Innovation for every child is a partly crowd-sourced digital resource that highlights how new ways of solving problems – often emerging from local communities and from young people themselves – can help reduce the inequities that prevent millions of children from realizing their rights under the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The report features stories of innovators of all ages from across the globe who are helping to tackle some of the most pressing problems facing children, and especially the most vulnerable. Their innovations range from technological advances to social, cultural and organisational rethinks. They demonstrate that the answers to the world’s problems are coming from all parts of the world and that communities, entrepreneurs and young people themselves are pushing the boundaries of what is possible and coming up with local solutions that can have a global impact.
Ans: On the 25th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child, UNICEF believes urgent action is needed to harness innovation so that it benefits every child. The report calls on governments, businesses, activists and communities to work together to drive new ideas to tackle pressing problems facing children and to scale up the best concepts from local innovators. The report challenges us all to work and think differently if we are to address the needs of some of the world’s most disadvantaged children.
Ans: he report profiles scores of innovations in a number of different fields, from technology to organisational. They include: • Solar Ear, the world’s first rechargeable hearing aid battery charger, developed to meet the needs of communities lacking regular access to electricity; it can be charged via the sun, household light,or a cell phone plug. (Tendekayi Katsiga, Deaftronics, Zimbabwe/ Botswana) • Community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM), a model of care that moves away from the traditional, expensive, low-coverage model of inpatient therapeutic feeding centres, treats people in their homes with the support of local clinics and using ready-to-use therapeutic foods. (Steve Collins, co-Founder and Director of VALID Nutrition) • New ways to engage Liberian youth in the midst of the Ebola crisis through U-report, a mobile phone-based system developed with young people, that helps examine what issues are most important to young people (UNICEF, Liberia) • Floating schools that provide year-round access to education for children living in flood-prone regions of Bangladesh. (Mohammed Rezwan, Founding Executive Director of the NGO Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha) • Vibrasor, a device invented by two teenage girls in Colombia, to help people with hearing impairments navigate safely through busy urban areas. (Isamar Cartagena, Katherine Fernandez) • To find a new solution to help those lacking access to electricity in Nigeria, four teenage girls invented a urine-powered generator. (Nigeria)
Ans: The report profiles scores of innovations in a number of different fields, from technology to organisational. They include: • Solar Ear, the world’s first rechargeable hearing aid battery charger, developed to meet the needs of communities lacking regular access to electricity; it can be charged via the sun, household light,or a cell phone plug. (Tendekayi Katsiga, Deaftronics, Zimbabwe/ Botswana) • Community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM), a model of care that moves away from the traditional, expensive, low-coverage model of inpatient therapeutic feeding centres, treats people in their homes with the support of local clinics and using ready-to-use therapeutic foods. (Steve Collins, co-Founder and Director of VALID Nutrition) • New ways to engage Liberian youth in the midst of the Ebola crisis through U-report, a mobile phone-based system developed with young people, that helps examine what issues are most important to young people (UNICEF, Liberia) • Floating schools that provide year-round access to education for children living in flood-prone regions of Bangladesh. (Mohammed Rezwan, Founding Executive Director of the NGO Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha) • Vibrasor, a device invented by two teenage girls in Colombia, to help people with hearing impairments navigate safely through busy urban areas. (Isamar Cartagena, Katherine Fernandez) • To find a new solution to help those lacking access to electricity in Nigeria, four teenage girls invented a urine-powered generator. (Nigeria)
Ans: Children and young people are natural innovators. They are also acutely aware and deeply concerned about the challenges facing their communities. Some of the young innovators included in the report are: * Viraj Puri, 14, who created Bullyvention, a way to leverage the power of people and technology to track and advocate against cyberbullying. * Isamar Cartagena, 18, who invented Vibrasor, a device she and her classmate Katherine Fernandez developed to help people with hearing impairments in Colombia navigate safely through busy urban areas. * Bisman Deu, 16, who developed GreenWood, a building material made from unwanted rice waste, which is often burned, causing air pollution, killing crop-friendly insects and making the topmost layer of soil partially infertile due to loss of nutrients.